Chocolate Crinkle Cookies

Chocolate lovers take note: these Chocolate Crinkle Cookies will satisfy your most desperate chocolate cravings. Not only are they delicious, they’re beautiful. When you set out a tray of treats during the holiday season, these bright and crackly little cookies will stand out from the crowd.

This dough often seems runny for a cookie dough. Once it has been chilled in the refrigerator, it sets up into a thicker more dough-like texture. The dough can be a bit sticky to work with, so I always roll the balls with wet hands to ensure the dough doesn’t stick to my skin too much. I simply use my fingers to roll it in the confectioner’s sugar (also known as powdered sugar), but you could use a pair of non-stick tongs to help you do the rolling if you wish. The white color turns out best after baking if you give the balls several rolls through the powdered sugar before baking. I try to let the first coat of sugar soak into the dough a bit before you start the outer coat.

Sticky chilled dough.

When placing the cookies on the cookie sheet to bake, it can be easy to place them too close together. Still in the ball stage, it can be difficult to imagine how much they’ll spread out as they bake. I suggest spacing the balls about 1 1/2 – 2 inches apart. You may even want to space them more if you make dough balls larger than teaspoon size. Generally, I bake them a dozen at a time until the dough is used.

Parchment works best as a lining for cookie sheets with this recipe. The confectioner’s sugar doesn’t stick to it and the cookies should come off easily. If you make these cookies with an unlined but greased cookie sheet, the confectioner’s sugar on the bottom and sides will take on a clunky greased look and the cookies may spread a bit too much. In my experience parchment paper is the best possible choice for good results. If you don’t have any on hand, I recommend picking some up. Generally, it is inexpensive and lasts a very long time in a dry cupboard for storage. It’s crucial that you don’t confuse parchment paper with wax paper as wax paper should never be used in the oven as it’s likely to burn and also melt into (and ruin) your cookies. A silicon baking liner may be used in place of parchment, however.

Chocolate Crinkle Cookies

3 from 17 votes
Recipe by Add Recipes Course: Dessert
Servings

24

servings
Prep time

30

minutes
Cooking time

22

minutes

Fudgy, delicious chocolate cookies with a powdered sugar coating.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup All-purpose flour

  • 2 Eggs, large

  • 1/2 cup Cocoa powder

  • 1/2 cup Sugar, white granulated

  • 1/2 cup Brown sugar, loosely packed

  • 1/2 cup Butter, softened

  • 1/4 cup Confectioner’s sugar

  • 1 tablespoon Vanilla extract

  • 1 teaspoon Baking powder

  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 350° F (175° C). Line cookie sheet with parchment paper.
  • In large mixing bowl or stand mixer bowl, cream together softened butter, sugar, brown sugar, and vanilla extract.
  • Add eggs and beat to combine.
  • Sift in flour, cocoa powder, baking powder. Add salt. Stir until thoroughly combined. Dough will seem somewhat thin until chilled.
  • Chill dough in refrigerator for 3 hours.
  • Place confectioner’s sugar in shallow dish. Remove chilled dough from refrigerator. With wet hands, form dough into teaspoon sized balls. Roll balls in confectioner’s sugar and coat thoroughly.
  • Place balls on cookie sheet spaced 1 1/2 – 2 inches apart as cookies will spread.
  • Bake cookies in batches in preheated oven for 8-11 minutes or until cookies are set. Cool on wire rack, then serve.

Notes

  • Recommend natural unsweetened cocoa powder, but other cocoa powder may be used for different results.
  • Salted or unsalted butter may be used. Margarine or equivalent amount of vegetable or other neutral oil may be substituted for butter — texture, taste of cookies will change.
Half eaten Chocolate Crinkle Cookie.

Chocolate Crinkle Cookies are a very brownie-like cookie. Because of that, they can be a bit soft when they come out of the oven. They firm up and become a bit more structurally sound as they cool, but be careful moving them to the cooling rack with your spatula. Although, if you break one, the good news is they taste just as delicious!

Leave a Comment