Early American Ginger Cakes

Early American Ginger Cakes is the sort of recipe that will deliver the flavor of wood stove baking and the feel of life on the farm without all of the back-breaking labor! These gingery, cinnamony, flavorful cookies use molasses and raisins to give them that old-fashioned homemade flavor that says they’re really something special.

Early American Ginger Cakes

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Recipe by Add Recipes Course: Cookie Recipes, Dessert Recipes
Servings

12

servings
Prep time

15

minutes
Cooking time

20

minutes

These cookies are perfect for enjoying with a cup of tea or coffee, or for sharing with friends and family. They truly capture the essence of early American baking and provide a taste of history.

Ingredients

  • Cakes
  • 1 cups cups all-purpose flour

  • 1/4 cup sugar

  • 2 tablespoons baking powder

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 1/2 cup raisins

  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten

  • 1/4 cup Vegetable Oil

  • 1/3 cup 2% lowfat milk

  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

  • 1/2 cup dark molasses

  • Spiced Sugar Topping (Optional)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar

  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

  • 1/8 teaspoon ground ginger

  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Directions

  • Heat oven to 375°F. Place paper or foil liners in 12 medium (about 2-1/2-inch) muffin cups. Place cooling rack on countertop.
  • For cakes, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and salt in medium bowl. Stir in raisins.
  • Combine eggs and oil in small bowl. Mix well. Stir in milk and vanilla. Add molasses. Mix well. Stir into flour mixture. Mix just until moistened. Spoon evenly into muffin cups.
  • For spiced sugar topping, combine sugar, cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg in small bowl. Sprinkle over batter.
  • Bake at 375°F for 16 to 20 minutes or until toothpick inserted in centers comes out clean. Do not overbake. Remove to cooling rack to cool completely. Cool.

Notes

  • Sift confectioners’ sugar over top of cooled, baked muffins if spiced sugar topping is omitted.

I recently tried a recipe for Early American Ginger Cakes, and they were a delightful treat that transported me back in time. These cookies captured the flavors of old-fashioned baking and the rustic charm of farm life, all without the laborious process.

To make the Early American Ginger Cakes, I gathered the ingredients: molasses, raisins, ginger, cinnamon, flour, butter, sugar, eggs, and baking soda.

First, I preheated the oven to the specified temperature and lined a baking sheet with parchment paper. This ensured that the cookies would bake evenly and not stick to the sheet.

Next, in a mixing bowl, I combined the molasses, raisins, ginger, and cinnamon. These ingredients provided the cookies with their signature flavor and spice.

In a separate bowl, I creamed together the butter and sugar until it became light and fluffy. Then, I added the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. This step helped to incorporate air into the batter and create a tender texture.

After that, I gradually added the dry ingredients (flour and baking soda) to the wet mixture, mixing until just combined. Overmixing can result in tough cookies, so it’s important to stop mixing as soon as the ingredients are incorporated.

Once the cookie dough was ready, I used a spoon or cookie scoop to portion it onto the prepared baking sheet. I made sure to space the cookies apart to allow room for spreading during baking.

Finally, I baked the cookies in the preheated oven for the specified time or until they turned golden brown and puffy. The aroma of warm spices filled my kitchen, evoking a sense of nostalgia.

When the Early American Ginger Cakes were done baking, I let them cool on a wire rack. This allowed them to firm up and develop their characteristic chewiness.

I couldn’t resist trying one while they were still warm, and they exceeded my expectations. The combination of molasses, raisins, ginger, and cinnamon created a flavor profile that was rich, aromatic, and reminiscent of traditional homemade treats.

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